Integrating Participatory Video into research projects provides opportunities for subject groups and communities to take part in determining what is being researched, collaborate on the different stages, acquire research skills, democratise knowledge generation and share the results. Here are examples of videos, articles, photostories and case studies where Participatory Video has been used by InsightShare as a research tool or as part of a research project.
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The strengths and challenges of Participatory Video for M&E in gender-based violence programmes

This is a presentation on some of the key methodological learning, strengths and challenges of using Participatory Video in gender-based violence programming and to support adolescent girls and women evaluate programming in which they are key actors.


Participatory Video for Climate Change Adaptation, Angola

In June and July 2012, eleven farmers from the Cariango Commune in the province of Kwanza Sul, Angola, took part in a participatory video project to explore the impacts of climate change on their livelihoods. After much debate the group decided to focus on the issue of drought as something common to all, and to use the video to explore different ways in which it is impacting the four different communities, by gathering local ideas and stories.


Participatory Video for Monitoring & Evaluation CASE STUDY: Community-Based Adaptation in Africa

In 2009 InsightShare was invited by IIED (International Institute for Environment and Development) to develop ways to use participatory video to monitor and evaluate climate change adaptation. Over 18 months, we held workshops in South Africa, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Malawi under the Community-Based Adaptation in Africa (CBAA) initiative.


LEAP Sport Evaluation

In December 2007, Kenya - long considered one of the most stable countries in East Africa - descended into political violence following disputed presidential elections. The city of Eldoret was one of the locations where the violence escalated. Mercy Corps decided to use sport in Eldoret as a means to change perceptions between tribes, build peace, promote reconciliation and give young people a hope for the future. The program was called LEAP Sport and is being run by a local organisation called A-STEP.