Through taking part in Participatory Video people can grow in self-esteem, value their knowledge, reflect on local issues, share perspectives, identify commonalities and ways forward. This process leads to critical thinking and collective local action. Here are some examples from InsightShare projects.
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London Refugee Women's Forum - 'Asylum is a Human Right'

A participatory video made by the London Refugee Women's Forum: sharing their stories of the asylum process, representing their campaign against destitution amongst asylum seekers, and documenting their visit to parliament.


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The Space for Civil Society

Human rights defenders, activists, civil society leaders and representatives from non-governmental organisations discuss the challenges they face in countries across southern Africa and beyond.  It features interviews covering a range of countries and contexts, and includes an interview with the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association, Maina Kiai.


Autumn Newsletter 2013

This newsletter is packed with: exciting news about our meeting with Aung San Suu Kyi, reports from the latest edition of our UK-based training of trainers and a capacity building programme in Myanmar, links to new videos, photo stories and publications and more.


Participatory Video Evaluation for Mercy Corps in Kenya

Mercy Corps' Financial Literacy training has been running for the last 2 years in Rift Valley province. The program was put in place to provide saving, borrowing, spending and investment skills to the funded and randomly selected youth groups within the Local Empowerment for Peace program (LEAP). Mercy Corps invited us to facilitate a participatory video evaluation with program participants in May / June 2013.


Participatory Video in Sakal Aduma

In December 2012, IUCN Netherlands invited InsightShare to conduct a capacity building programme in participatory video facilitation for its partner staff based in Meghalaya, north-east India. A three-stage training programme was developed for staff from the Wildlife Trust of India and reporters from the ‘What If We Change’ project, and delivered between January and April 2013. View the photo story here: http://tinyurl.com/PhotostorySakalAduma


PV Capacity Building in Myanmar - Stage 1

This is the story of the first stage of the 3-stage capacity building programme which aims to pilot Participatory Video as a tool for community development in the Ayeyarwady Delta in Myanmar. Local facilitators were trained to use participatory video to enable horizontal information sharing, provide a forum for participatory decision-making and a communication tool for local advocacy. View the photo story here: http://bit.ly/1Dmgrdt


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Capacity Building in Participatory Video - Myanmar

In August 2013, representatives from four villages in the Delta region of Myanmar joined a training programme in facilitating participatory video. This unique capacity-building programme was the first of its kind in Myanmar.  It was designed to provide trainees with all the technical and facilitation skills necessary to undertake participatory video processes, within their communities.


Bukonzo Joint ('Our Environment')

A group of 11 farmers, members of the Bukonzo Joint Co-operative, came together for a participatory video project to plan and shoot a video about their local environment, before creating a screening in the community to raise debate around sustainable agricultural practice.


Ericaville Farming Trust

In this participatory video project a film is made by 11 members of the Ericaville Farming Trust. A complicated process led to the participants going out into their community to enable a group of youth, elders and women to come together to tell their stories through a participatory video process, and community screening. The video tells the story of their journey together as a community. The past displacement from the West Coast and their resettlement along the coast of the Southern Cape, South Africa, their longing to own land and to farm became a reality after a wait of 30 years.